The Knowledge Exchange Unit supports the exchange of information between UK Researchers and Parliament. They prepare a list of opportunities for researchers each week, which we will be disseminating in part through this blog.

If you are engaging in any of these opportunities, please email Glenn Harris or Suzi Edwards

These opportunities have been compiled by UK Parliament’s Knowledge Exchange Unit (KEU).

Take a look at the KEU’s webhub of information and resources for researchers

These opportunities and resources have been sent to members of the KEU’s informal network for knowledge mobilisers, for circulation to researchers and others (find out more about the network).

Select committee inquiries launched in the last seven days (since 18 November 2021)

Please click the title of any inquiry listed below to be taken to a summary of that inquiry and the full call for evidence.

Why should I engage? Submitting evidence to a select committee can lead to further engagement, such as an invitation to give oral evidence. Your submission will be published on the Committee webpage. Your insights may inform the Committee’s conclusions or recommendations it makes to the Government. Find out more about why to engage with Parliament. You can also read more on engagement for impact.
More information: Explore all select committee inquiries currently open for submissions of written evidence

Support resources: Find guidance on submitting evidence to select committees on the KEU’s ‘how to guides’ page.

Contribute your expertise to a POSTnote (research briefing for parliamentarians)

POST (Parliamentary Office of Science and Technology) is currently writing a POSTnote (briefing) on age assessments of children in immigration policy. This is a complex and controversial topic. This POSTnote will assess current approaches and summarise stakeholder views on the topic.

POSTnotes are impartial, non-partisan, and peer-reviewed briefings, designed to make scientific research accessible to the UK Parliament.

You can find more information on this POSTnote on age assessments of children in immigration policy. If you would like to contribute to this POSTnote with literature, expertise or as a peer-reviewer on this topic, please email the author, Samir Hamdoud.

Why should I engage? Giving oral evidence to a select committee, or taking part in a round table with committee members, is a great opportunity to present your expertise directly to MPs or Members of the House of Lords. If you give oral evidence, the session will be broadcast online and a transcript of your evidence session will be published on the Committee webpage. Your insights may inform the Committee’s conclusions or recommendations it makes to the Government. Find out more about why to engage with Parliament. You can also read more on engagement for impact.
Support resources: Find guidance on submitting evidence to select committees on the KEU’s ‘how to guides’ page.  Watch our online training session on ‘Exploring select committee evidence’.

Reminder: Help us understand the barriers to applying to the Parliamentary Academic Fellowship Scheme 

The Knowledge Exchange Unit (KEU) evaluates all of its knowledge exchange activities to ensure that they meet their aims, are barrier-free, effective and impactful, and that those involved have a positive experience.  

The Parliamentary Academic Fellowship Scheme is one of our key activities. Therefore, we are keen to understand the insights and experiences of all the different groups of people involved or engaged in any way in the Scheme (Directed and Open Calls). As part of this, we are keen to hear from researchers or knowledge mobilisers who would have liked to have applied to a Scheme but didn’t.  

If this applies to you, we are pleased to invite you to complete the short questionnaire by Friday 17 December to help us understand the barriers to the Parliamentary Academic Fellowship Scheme.  

A Parliament fact they (probably) didn’t teach you in school

What on earth is secondary legislation?

It is law created by ministers (or other bodies) under powers given to them by an Act of Parliament. It is used to fill in the details of Acts (primary legislation). These details provide practical measures that enable the law to be enforced and operate in daily life. It can be used to set the date for when provisions of an Act will come into effect as law, or to amend existing laws.

So what? The making of legislation can seem like an impenetrable process, but you can follow the passage of primary and secondary legislation on the Parliament website.  There are sometimes opportunities to contribute. And there are offices at Parliament who can help to answer your questions.

More information: Find out how laws are made, and more about secondary legislation. You can find every Bill (draft law) currently going through Parliament. If you have questions about the legislative process or secondary legislation, you can contact the House of Commons enquiry service, or contact the House of Lords enquiry service.